Viking cues

Viking cues

Post by Chuck W » Sun, 12 Mar 1995 18:08:10


hi folx.  does anyone have any general comments about cues made by Viking?
the reason I ask is that it's the only brand I can see myself affording
anytime soon  :)

- Chuck

 
 
 

Viking cues

Post by David Lesli » Tue, 14 Mar 1995 06:18:39

Chuck, While some of the Vikings are good cues, I would save a bit
more and try either Joss or McDaniels. Vikings for some reason have
just never felt right for my game (9 and 14.1) and you can find a
better stick at about the same price from some of the other makers.
If you would like a list, just let me know.

David

 
 
 

Viking cues

Post by newus » Tue, 14 Mar 1995 06:23:48


Quote:

>hi folx.  does anyone have any general comments about cues made by
Viking?
>the reason I ask is that it's the only brand I can see myself affording
>anytime soon  :)

>- Chuck

Dollar for dollar, it's hard to beat a Viking.  They are solid and well
made.

--JIM BUSS--

 
 
 

Viking cues

Post by Scott A. Jenki » Wed, 15 Mar 1995 12:56:58

I am also a beginner, and I bought a Viking cue.  Frankly, my game is not
good enough that the cue helps or hinders.

What is important to me about having it is that I play with the -same-
cue every time, and it is the weight that I like.  The only detail that
was important to me in choosing it, other than the weight, was that I
did not get one with the nylon wrap, because I didn't like the feel.

Other than that, it seems to be a good enough cue for me as a beginner.

Bon chance.


e

 
 
 

Viking cues

Post by mark.kul.. » Sat, 18 Mar 1995 06:44:04

VIKING?
Aren't those cues sold in Sportm..t?

You can buy a plain jane cue from some of the BEST.

Mark.

 
 
 

Viking cues

Post by Scott A. Jenki » Sat, 18 Mar 1995 06:53:39

Quote:

>VIKING?
>Aren't those cues sold in Sportm..t?

Actually, I bought mine in Champion's Billiard Supply in Alexandria, VA.
They are far superior to the ones sold in the sporting good stores.

And maybe I am silly, but wouldn't you have to be awfully good before
the difference between a good $150 cue and the dream $15,000 cue would
actually effect your game?


 
 
 

Viking cues

Post by Ahmed Kazm » Sat, 18 Mar 1995 22:13:49


Quote:

>>VIKING?
>>Aren't those cues sold in Sportm..t?
>Actually, I bought mine in Champion's Billiard Supply in Alexandria, VA.
>They are far superior to the ones sold in the sporting good stores.

Most of the sporting goods stores get the cues, display some and store the
rest in damp (dark dungeons :-) areas.  Although the sticks are in plastic
bags, but the bags are not sealed at one end and the joints are usually
exposed to moisture.  So to find a straight stick at a sporting goods
stores involves luck.  The billiard supply places display almost all the
stock and better treat the equipment, but they are always more expensive
than the sporting goods stores.
Other than this I am not sure why the same model would be better at the
billiard supply place.

Quote:
>And maybe I am silly, but wouldn't you have to be awfully good before
>the difference between a good $150 cue and the dream $15,000 cue would
>actually effect your game?

Quite a few people share this opinion.

-Ahmed

 
 
 

Viking cues

Post by Scott A. Jenki » Sat, 18 Mar 1995 23:15:06

Re: the discussion of Viking cues and their availability in billiards
stores vs.  general sproting good stores:

Quote:
>Most of the sporting goods stores get the cues, display some and store the
>rest in damp (dark dungeons :-) areas.  Although the sticks are in plastic
>bags, but the bags are not sealed at one end and the joints are usually
>exposed to moisture.  So to find a straight stick at a sporting goods
>stores involves luck.  The billiard supply places display almost all the
>stock and better treat the equipment, but they are always more expensive
>than the sporting goods stores.

Actually, what I meant is that I that when I have been in a Sport
Authorty, Hermans, whatever, I have -never- seen a cue with a brand name.
Even the low-end Viking that I have, I could only find in a billiard
specialty store.


 
 
 

Viking cues

Post by Chuck W » Sun, 19 Mar 1995 16:38:09



Quote:

>>VIKING?
>>Aren't those cues sold in Sportm..t?

nope.  I bought my Spalding in Sproutmart though  :)  (the tip sux and the
joint is a bit crooked.)

Quote:
>And maybe I am silly, but wouldn't you have to be awfully good before
>the difference between a good $150 cue and the dream $15,000 cue would
>actually effect your game?

I would think that if you were awfully good then your cue wouldn't make
much of a difference one way or the other!

- Chuck

 
 
 

Viking cues

Post by Jerry Lazzaresc » Mon, 20 Mar 1995 15:51:47

Quote:
>>And maybe I am silly, but wouldn't you have to be awfully good before
>>the difference between a good $150 cue and the dream $15,000 cue would
>>actually effect your game?

>I would think that if you were awfully good then your cue wouldn't make
>much of a difference one way or the other!

>- Chuck

Well the cue is equal to about 10-15% of your game!

See ya...Jerry

 
 
 

Viking cues

Post by mark.kul.. » Wed, 22 Mar 1995 04:13:22

Chuck makes a strong point!
All you need is a good tip.
But, A good cue in hand has some positive psychological effects.
Too bad it doesn't effect your opponent in the reverse. :O)

Mark

 
 
 

Viking cues

Post by Ralph Leslie Dav » Wed, 22 Mar 1995 22:21:44

Quote:
>>I would think that if you were awfully good then your cue wouldn't make
>>much of a difference one way or the other!

>>- Chuck

>Well the cue is equal to about 10-15% of your game!

>See ya...Jerry

Is this your personal perception, or is this 10-15% documented
somewhere?  I'd like to know so I can refute my friend who insists
that the stick makes no difference for a truly good player.

--Ralph

 
 
 

Viking cues

Post by Hank Miller, Ph.D., TSU Counseling Cent » Thu, 23 Mar 1995 06:22:03


Quote:
>>>I would think that if you were awfully good then your cue wouldn't make
>>>much of a difference one way or the other!

>>>- Chuck

>>Well the cue is equal to about 10-15% of your game!

>>See ya...Jerry

>Is this your personal perception, or is this 10-15% documented
>somewhere?  I'd like to know so I can refute my friend who insists
>that the stick makes no difference for a truly good player.

>--Ralph


I can't resist the temtation to jump into this discussion and give my own 2 or
3 cents worth.  A really great player will still be a really great player with
virtually any cue that is not broken or terribly warped, etc.  A lousy player
will still be a lousy player with a $7000 custom, one-of-a-kind collectors
item.  That having been said, there are some real differences in pool cues.
Those of you who have been reading this group for a while have seen any number
of cogent, articulate explanations of different cues and how they relate to
deflection, aim, action on the cue ball, touch, hardness of hit and probably a
bunch of other variables that don't immediately come to mind.

As someone who sells very expensive ($1000-10,000) cues, I am, of course,
biased with regard to the subject.  The fact of the matter is, IMHO, that while
there are significant diferences in workmanship, construction, fit/finish and
longevity potential among cues, these differences do not necessarily make the
cue any better at sinking balls.  There are any number of modern cuemakers,
many of whom are considered true artists, who, in private, will tell you that
the work of Balabushka and Szambotti, while germinal and important, pale by
comparison to newer makers' work.  The fact that they are expensive is a
function of, not only their quality, but because they are desireable from a
collector's perspective.  The same could be said of Elvis's shorts, if someone
had a pair.  Who knows what a Valley house cue would be worth if Paul Newman
had given one to Tom Cruise in "The Color of Money."

While the more expensive cues may not play significantly better (certainly a
$5000 cue does not play 5 times better than a $1000 cue) it may bring more
pleasure in a different domain.  You can drive to work in a Toyota Tercel or in
a Lexus--both will get you there, one, you may enjoy more.  There are
significant numbers of folks who will pay great sums of money to own what they
consider an artistic masterpiece with which they can also sink some balls.
What this all boils down to is--you get what you pay for (if you're lucky), if
you know what you want.  If you want the best hit for the buck and don't care
about looks, I would recommend buying any of the best makers (e-mail if you
want my opinion on who they are) lowest priced cues.  The best cuemakers will
put the same quality and workmanship into their $395-$595 cue that they will
their $6000 cue, it just won't be very fancy.  Some of them, however, will be
quite lovely because of the beauty of the wood.

I appologize for going on so long, but I just returned from the Expo in Philly,
which was "cue lovers Mecca."  Virtually all of the best cuemakers in the
country displaying hundreds of incredibly beautiful cues, all in the same area.
A pool cue fanatic's wet dream!

            -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

            |  "The best things in life are free...         |
            |   the second best things are very expensive." |
            -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

 
 
 

Viking cues

Post by Jerry Lazzaresc » Thu, 23 Mar 1995 14:03:38


Quote:

>>>I would think that if you were awfully good then your cue wouldn't make
>>>much of a difference one way or the other!

>>>- Chuck

>>Well the cue is equal to about 10-15% of your game!

>>See ya...Jerry

>Is this your personal perception, or is this 10-15% documented
>somewhere?  I'd like to know so I can refute my friend who insists
>that the stick makes no difference for a truly good player.

>--Ralph


Those are the figures that I've heard all the good players that I know say...I personally can
tell you that, If I walk into a pool hall and pick up just any stick, it's going to make atleast
10-15% of my game...As far as being documented, I really don't know if it is...As far as your
friend's comment, I think it's completely opposite...If someone isn't a very good player, no cue
is going to help them...If you take someone like Nick Varner for instance...If he played with
just any stick off of the rack, I'm sure that he still would play great!...but I don't think
that he would play the runout pool that he normally does, without his cue!

See ya...Jerry

 
 
 

Viking cues

Post by Jerry Lazzaresc » Thu, 23 Mar 1995 14:07:19


Quote:

>Re: the discussion of Viking cues and their availability in billiards
>stores vs.  general sproting good stores:

>>Most of the sporting goods stores get the cues, display some and store the
>>rest in damp (dark dungeons :-) areas.  Although the sticks are in plastic
>>bags, but the bags are not sealed at one end and the joints are usually
>>exposed to moisture.  So to find a straight stick at a sporting goods
>>stores involves luck.  The billiard supply places display almost all the
>>stock and better treat the equipment, but they are always more expensive
>>than the sporting goods stores.

>Actually, what I meant is that I that when I have been in a Sport
>Authorty, Hermans, whatever, I have -never- seen a cue with a brand name.
>Even the low-end Viking that I have, I could only find in a billiard
>specialty store.



I'm with you Scott!...I haven't seen a good cue in a Sporting Goods store ever...but then I
wouldn't really look to buy a cue in a Sporting Goods store either!

Jerry