Nickel and dime radius

Nickel and dime radius

Post by Steve » Fri, 31 Aug 2012 02:32:50


In reading, I hear the term "nickel and dime radius".  What does that mean?

Steve

 
 
 

Nickel and dime radius

Post by Bill » Fri, 31 Aug 2012 22:59:11


Quote:

> In reading, I hear the term "nickel and dime radius".  What does that mean?

Hold the tip of a cue stick up in front of your eye and you will see the
tip has a curve. Different cue stick tips will have different curves,
some are more "round" and others are more "flat".

Hold various coins up in front of the tip and you can match the curve to
the curve of a particular coin. More flat would be like a quarter. More
round would be like a dime. Many tip shaping tools are a nickel shape.
Some are dime shape. (Low deflection cues come from the factory with a
dime shape - that is the shape I use on my playing cues.)

Go into a bar and look at the cue sticks on the wall. Those tips are
probably more flat. They don't get much maintenance if any. Also people
use them for breaking. This "squishes" in the tip and makes it more
flat.

Better players keep their tip a particular shape like nickel or dime.

Also look at the tips of those bar pool cues under the table light. Many
of these have a dark "slick" surface. That is because they have not been
shaped or scuffed up (not maintained).

Then look at the tip of a good player's cue, it will not have any
"slick" spots and will have a nice even coating of chalk on it - all the
same color. Looks sort of like velvet.

The tips in good condition will "grip" the cue ball better. This is
important when hitting the cue ball off center (follow, draw, english).

If you use one of those "slick" bar pool cues to shoot an off center
shot, the tip may not grip the cue ball and it might go flying off into
space - a "miscue".

Here is some info on a flatter tip vs a rounder tip...
http://billiards.colostate.edu/threads/cue_tip.html#size

Note: The U.S. is not the only country in which pool is played. Other
countries have different shaped coins. For that reason I think pool
equipment manufacturers should come up with some sort of international
standard shapes - not use the shapes of a particular country's coins.

 
 
 

Nickel and dime radius

Post by Jack » Sun, 02 Sep 2012 00:53:24


Some comments from me:

Quote:
> Go into a bar and look at the cue sticks on the wall. Those tips are
> probably more flat. They don't get much maintenance if any. Also people
> use them for breaking. This "squishes" in the tip and makes it more
> flat.

I only use layered tips myself, and I break with my playing cue.  My
tips do not flatten out or mushroom, ever.  I use either Talisman Pro
Hard or Tiger Everest tips, can't vouch for other layered tips but I
suspect they are all about the same.

Quote:
> Better players keep their tip a particular shape like nickel or dime.

Also, after initial shaping, I do nothing to my tips, other than chalk
them.  I think how you chalk your tip has everything to do with the
shape of your tip. My tips maintain a nice dome shape, I start with a
dime and it seems to stay there.

Quote:
> Also look at the tips of those bar pool cues under the table light. Many
> of these have a dark "slick" surface. That is because they have not been
> shaped or scuffed up (not maintained).

I rarely miscue, and when I do it is my fault, not the tip.  Two main
(only?) causes of miscues are not properly chalking the tip and bad
stroke. Bad stoke includes cuing too far off center.  Well, there is
another cause, shitty chalk.  Never, ever use Tweetens NTC chalk for
example. In fact, Over the years I have learned to only use Tweeten's
Master or Silver Cup chalks.  I prefer Silver Cup because it is a tad
rougher and helps scuff up and shape the tip (in my mind).  Both work
fine, no reason to take a chance with any other chalk.  Other chalks,
particularly that NTC junk is used to***your opponent.  I prefer not
to do that to anyone.  If I see it on a table I ask my opponent if they
are using it, if not, I remove it.  It is that bad.

Quote:
> Then look at the tip of a good player's cue, it will not have any
> "slick" spots and will have a nice even coating of chalk on it - all the
> same color. Looks sort of like velvet.

When you miscue, you get a "slick spot" on the tip.  I see most people
going nutz tapping, picking, sanding and other destructive things to
their tip.  I have learned none of this is needed, and simply chalking
your tip correctly is all that's needed after a miscue.  This works with
both smooth Masters and the more abrasive Silver cup chalks.  All that
sanding, tapping and picking might help your mental state, but that's
about it.

Quote:
> The tips in good condition will "grip" the cue ball better. This is
> important when hitting the cue ball off center (follow, draw, english).
> If you use one of those "slick" bar pool cues to shoot an off center
> shot, the tip may not grip the cue ball and it might go flying off into
> space - a "miscue".

If you chalk up correctly, even the bar pool cues work OK.  The main
problem there is tip size and shape.  The size is important because if
you are used to a different size tip, you may not be hitting whitey
where you think.  This can/will change everything.  Of course this
assumes bar cues in reasonable shape, and regulation CB.

--
Jack
Add Life to your Days not Days to your Life.
http://SportToday.org/

 
 
 

Nickel and dime radius

Post by Ron Shepar » Sun, 02 Sep 2012 19:29:19


Quote:

> I only use layered tips myself, and I break with my playing cue.  My
> tips do not flatten out or mushroom, ever.  I use either Talisman Pro
> Hard or Tiger Everest tips, can't vouch for other layered tips but I
> suspect they are all about the same.

I have tried several layered tips, and most of them work pretty
well. They usually do mushroom a little, but not as much as
nonlayered tips.  This means that you can either ignore it, if it
isn't so bad to be distracting, or you have to trim them down less
often.  For my last moori, I trimmed it about two weeks after it was
new, then again a few weeks after that, and again after about six
months.  That was six months ago, and I probably won't trim it again
before I replace it, which will probably be around the end of the
year in between league sessions.  At the rate I'm playing now, a
moori tip lasts about two years.  A few years ago when I was playing
a little more often, they would last about a year.  That's about two
or three or maybe even four times longer than a LePro for me.

But there is also a downside to layered tips.  As the tip wears
down, the glue layer between the layers of leather (or pigskin, or
whatever) becomes exposed. If you wipe off the chalk and look
closely you can see it.  It is a ring around the tip, and it starts
on the outside circumference of the tip and appears to move toward
the center as the leather wears down.  This glue ring does not hold
chalk as well as the surrounding leather, and if the contact spot on
the tip happens to be right on that ring, then you are more likely
to get a miscue.  If you look at the tip after a miscue you will see
a little brown/green colored spot on the tip. I've had miscues like
this that were pretty close to the center.  I usually chalk before
every shot, but it is possible that I might have missed that
particular spot before that shot, so it is difficult to narrow down
the exact cause.  But if you use layered tips, this is just
something you have to live with.  It only happens once every hundred
shots or so, and only when the ring is there -- often enough to
notice, but not often enough to really narrow down what causes it or
how to prevent it.

$.02 -Ron Shepard