Slate lifting in table

Slate lifting in table

Post by Martin Eisenstei » Mon, 26 Jan 2004 07:51:30


Hello.  I bought a seven foot table recently from a west coast company
and had it shipped to New Jersey and installed by a local installer.
About three weeks after installation, I have noticed that one of the
three pieces of slate, a side piece, has lifted against the middle and
there is a line in the table, one that can be felt but not easily
seen.  Also, the felt seems to be pulled too tight near one of the
rails and balls near there tend to settle on the rail.  

What could be causing this?  Is there anyone in the Northern New
Jersey area who does this kind of repair?

Martin Eisenstein
201-863-3145
Martin Eisenstein

 
 
 

Slate lifting in table

Post by Smorgass Bor » Mon, 26 Jan 2004 08:31:04

Slate lifting in table  

(Martin?Eisenstein) axed seriously:
Hello. I bought a seven foot table recently from a west coast company
and had it shipped to New Jersey and installed by a local installer.

  (*<~   WHY ?

   are you SURE your name is Einstein..

                  Doug
 ~>*(((><  Big fish eat Little fish  ><)))*<~

 
 
 

Slate lifting in table

Post by Martin Eisenstei » Mon, 26 Jan 2004 09:04:49

Not sure I understand you, Einstein Jr.   But if you are asking why I
bought the table in this fashion, it was to save $1200 over lowest
quote of local stores.


Quote:

>Slate lifting in table  

>(Martin?Eisenstein) axed seriously:
>Hello. I bought a seven foot table recently from a west coast company
>and had it shipped to New Jersey and installed by a local installer.

>  (*<~   WHY ?

>   are you SURE your name is Einstein..

>                  Doug
> ~>*(((><  Big fish eat Little fish  ><)))*<~

Martin Eisenstein


 
 
 

Slate lifting in table

Post by Jim Wyan » Mon, 26 Jan 2004 10:37:09


Quote:

> Not sure I understand you, Einstein Jr.   But if you are asking why I
> bought the table in this fashion, it was to save $1200 over lowest
> quote of local stores.

Soooooo, is this still appearing to be a "deal" for you now?

The biggest problem with the global economy is local support.

--Jim

Quote:


>> Slate lifting in table

>> (Martin?Eisenstein) axed seriously:
>> Hello. I bought a seven foot table recently from a west coast company
>> and had it shipped to New Jersey and installed by a local installer.

>>  (*<~   WHY ?

>>   are you SURE your name is Einstein..

>>                  Doug
>> ~>*(((><  Big fish eat Little fish  ><)))*<~

> Martin Eisenstein


 
 
 

Slate lifting in table

Post by Martin Eisenstei » Mon, 26 Jan 2004 11:35:39

Sure seems to be a good deal still.  I have over a thousand dollars in
my pocket.  If I called in the best installers to take the table
apart, shim the table if necessary, replace the felt, and served them
filet mignon, I'd still be way way ahead.  

Once again, anyone have any ideas what might be causing this?



Quote:


>> Not sure I understand you, Einstein Jr.   But if you are asking why I
>> bought the table in this fashion, it was to save $1200 over lowest
>> quote of local stores.

>Soooooo, is this still appearing to be a "deal" for you now?

>The biggest problem with the global economy is local support.

>--Jim



>>> Slate lifting in table

>>> (Martin?Eisenstein) axed seriously:
>>> Hello. I bought a seven foot table recently from a west coast company
>>> and had it shipped to New Jersey and installed by a local installer.

>>>  (*<~   WHY ?

>>>   are you SURE your name is Einstein..

>>>                  Doug
>>> ~>*(((><  Big fish eat Little fish  ><)))*<~

>> Martin Eisenstein


Martin Eisenstein

 
 
 

Slate lifting in table

Post by PoolCar » Mon, 26 Jan 2004 13:29:49

Quote:
>Subject: Slate lifting in table

>Date: 1/24/04 4:51 PM Central Standard Time
>Hello.  I bought a seven foot table recently from a west coast company
>and had it shipped to New Jersey and installed by a local installer.
>About three weeks after installation, I have noticed that one of the
>three pieces of slate, a side piece, has lifted against the middle and
>there is a line in the table, one that can be felt but not easily
>seen.  Also, the felt seems to be pulled too tight near one of the
>rails and balls near there tend to settle on the rail.  

>What could be causing this?  Is there anyone in the Northern New
>Jersey area who does this kind of repair?

>Martin Eisenstein
>201-863-3145
>Martin Eisenstein


Call the installer back, if he is reputable I'm sure he would be happy to
correct the problem for you.

Jim Halladay
Billiarddoc.com

 
 
 

Slate lifting in table

Post by Mark » Mon, 26 Jan 2004 13:36:48

Yes.  I suspect a shim or two has come loose (or out) under one (or both) of
the slates in question.  You might try gently tapping in the one closest to
the low spot (and then anchoring it in place).

Or send me plane tickets, $200, and have a couple filets cooked medium for
me....

--
Mark0

Author of Secrets to a Perfect Pool Table Recovery Job
http://mccauleyweb.com/secrets.htm

Decode Pig Latin in domain to reply by email

=-=============================


Quote:
> Sure seems to be a good deal still.  I have over a thousand dollars in
> my pocket.  If I called in the best installers to take the table
> apart, shim the table if necessary, replace the felt, and served them
> filet mignon, I'd still be way way ahead.

> Once again, anyone have any ideas what might be causing this?



> >On 1/24/04 7:04 PM, in article


Quote:

> >> Not sure I understand you, Einstein Jr.   But if you are asking why I
> >> bought the table in this fashion, it was to save $1200 over lowest
> >> quote of local stores.

> >Soooooo, is this still appearing to be a "deal" for you now?

> >The biggest problem with the global economy is local support.

> >--Jim



> >>> Slate lifting in table

> >>> (Martin Eisenstein) axed seriously:
> >>> Hello. I bought a seven foot table recently from a west coast company
> >>> and had it shipped to New Jersey and installed by a local installer.

> >>>  (*<~   WHY ?

> >>>   are you SURE your name is Einstein..

> >>>                  Doug
> >>> ~>*(((><  Big fish eat Little fish  ><)))*<~

> >> Martin Eisenstein

> Martin Eisenstein


 
 
 

Slate lifting in table

Post by Martin Eisenstei » Mon, 26 Jan 2004 14:19:46

Your offer is appreciated and is under strong consideration!

On Sat, 24 Jan 2004 23:36:48 -0500, "Mark0"

Quote:

>Yes.  I suspect a shim or two has come loose (or out) under one (or both) of
>the slates in question.  You might try gently tapping in the one closest to
>the low spot (and then anchoring it in place).

>Or send me plane tickets, $200, and have a couple filets cooked medium for
>me....

Martin Eisenstein

 
 
 

Slate lifting in table

Post by Ninebal3 » Mon, 26 Jan 2004 21:24:22

Quote:
>From: Martin Eisenstein
>What could be causing this?  Is there anyone in the Northern New
>Jersey area who does this kind of repair?

>Martin Eisenstein

   I agree, call the installer back. Give him another chance to correct the
problem. If he isn't successful, check the shims (like Mark0 said). Sometimes
the wood shims dry out and shrink/loosen or may shift and loosen with movement
when the table is 'bumped" or settles. Most tables need to be re-leveled after
couple weeks anyway.

   Did he fill-in where the slates come together? If so, what did he use?
Hank
remove "mitted" for emailing

 
 
 

Slate lifting in table

Post by Martin Eisenstei » Tue, 27 Jan 2004 00:12:24

I believe he used melted wax.



Quote:
>>From: Martin Eisenstein

>>What could be causing this?  Is there anyone in the Northern New
>>Jersey area who does this kind of repair?

>>Martin Eisenstein

>   I agree, call the installer back. Give him another chance to correct the
>problem. If he isn't successful, check the shims (like Mark0 said). Sometimes
>the wood shims dry out and shrink/loosen or may shift and loosen with movement
>when the table is 'bumped" or settles. Most tables need to be re-leveled after
>couple weeks anyway.

>   Did he fill-in where the slates come together? If so, what did he use?
>Hank
>remove "mitted" for emailing

Martin Eisenstein

 
 
 

Slate lifting in table

Post by Ken Bou » Wed, 28 Jan 2004 11:04:44

Martin:

In my experience as a table owner for over 8 years, the slate seams split
due to (1) humidity changes, (2) shifting of the table's substructure
(probably caused by humidity), (3) shims slipping out (humidity?), and, of
course, (4) rough-housing (which we'll rule out in this case).  I've been
advised by cuemakers, more than a few times, that wood is "alive" and
moves -- a lot.  I have an expensive wood cue with silver rings that has
been refinished 3 times over the last couple of years and the rings have
popped out again.  The cuemaker is willing to fix it for free each time, of
course, but it just demonstrates the amount of movement in the raw material.
It's small wonder that, under certain circumstances (e.g. humidity changes),
those slate pieces slide away from each other.

The easiest fix, which I just learned myself recently from a top craftsman,
is to get under the table with a small hammer.  Find which piece of slate is
lower and tap a shim gently under the support beam to raise it until it is
flush.  The last time this happened on my table (just a couple of months
after it was freshly recovered/releveled), it worked like a charm.  If that
approach doesn't fix the problem, then call back the installation crew
although it's probably not anything they did wrong.

Maybe tables should be made from a synthetic substance precisely to avoid
these problems with wood.  My table is in a ba***t which undergoes
significant changes in seasonal humidity.  In the summer, I can pull out 5
gal. of water each week or so from the de-humidifier.  In the winter, the
unit never even cuts on, so I decommission it until spring.  In my case, I
end up with a seam split about once a year on the average.  Fortunately, I
have learned how to fix them myself until the table needs to be recovered.

Ken Bour


Quote:
> Hello.  I bought a seven foot table recently from a west coast company
> and had it shipped to New Jersey and installed by a local installer.
> About three weeks after installation, I have noticed that one of the
> three pieces of slate, a side piece, has lifted against the middle and
> there is a line in the table, one that can be felt but not easily
> seen.  Also, the felt seems to be pulled too tight near one of the
> rails and balls near there tend to settle on the rail.

> What could be causing this?  Is there anyone in the Northern New
> Jersey area who does this kind of repair?

> Martin Eisenstein
> 201-863-3145
> Martin Eisenstein


 
 
 

Slate lifting in table

Post by Martin Eisenstei » Wed, 28 Jan 2004 23:57:14

Thanks for your very detailed and insightful response.  
The installer is coming back later this week to look at the table.  I
will talk to him about shimming the slate.

Marty



Quote:
>Martin:

>In my experience as a table owner for over 8 years, the slate seams split
>due to (1) humidity changes, (2) shifting of the table's substructure
>(probably caused by humidity), (3) shims slipping out (humidity?), and, of
>course, (4) rough-housing (which we'll rule out in this case).  I've been
>advised by cuemakers, more than a few times, that wood is "alive" and
>moves -- a lot.  I have an expensive wood cue with silver rings that has
>been refinished 3 times over the last couple of years and the rings have
>popped out again.  The cuemaker is willing to fix it for free each time, of
>course, but it just demonstrates the amount of movement in the raw material.
>It's small wonder that, under certain circumstances (e.g. humidity changes),
>those slate pieces slide away from each other.

>The easiest fix, which I just learned myself recently from a top craftsman,
>is to get under the table with a small hammer.  Find which piece of slate is
>lower and tap a shim gently under the support beam to raise it until it is
>flush.  The last time this happened on my table (just a couple of months
>after it was freshly recovered/releveled), it worked like a charm.  If that
>approach doesn't fix the problem, then call back the installation crew
>although it's probably not anything they did wrong.

>Maybe tables should be made from a synthetic substance precisely to avoid
>these problems with wood.  My table is in a ba***t which undergoes
>significant changes in seasonal humidity.  In the summer, I can pull out 5
>gal. of water each week or so from the de-humidifier.  In the winter, the
>unit never even cuts on, so I decommission it until spring.  In my case, I
>end up with a seam split about once a year on the average.  Fortunately, I
>have learned how to fix them myself until the table needs to be recovered.

>Ken Bour



>> Hello.  I bought a seven foot table recently from a west coast company
>> and had it shipped to New Jersey and installed by a local installer.
>> About three weeks after installation, I have noticed that one of the
>> three pieces of slate, a side piece, has lifted against the middle and
>> there is a line in the table, one that can be felt but not easily
>> seen.  Also, the felt seems to be pulled too tight near one of the
>> rails and balls near there tend to settle on the rail.

>> What could be causing this?  Is there anyone in the Northern New
>> Jersey area who does this kind of repair?

>> Martin Eisenstein
>> 201-863-3145
>> Martin Eisenstein


Martin Eisenstein

 
 
 

Slate lifting in table

Post by Pa » Thu, 29 Jan 2004 13:13:38

Quote:

> Hello.  I bought a seven foot table recently from a west coast company
> and had it shipped to New Jersey and installed by a local installer.
> About three weeks after installation, I have noticed that one of the
> three pieces of slate, a side piece, has lifted against the middle and
> there is a line in the table, one that can be felt but not easily
> seen.  Also, the felt seems to be pulled too tight near one of the
> rails and balls near there tend to settle on the rail.  

> What could be causing this?  Is there anyone in the Northern New
> Jersey area who does this kind of repair?

> Martin Eisenstein
> 201-863-3145
> Martin Eisenstein


www.Pool-Table-Services.com  do work through out NJ and parts of NY & PA.