frisbees (frisbie pie tins)

frisbees (frisbie pie tins)

Post by du » Sat, 07 Sep 1991 11:27:40



Quote:
>Someone mentioned in sport.disc that a frisbie pie tin (the original
>frisbee flying saucer - from the frisbie pie company) might be worth up
>to $1000.00  Was he mistaken or are they really that rare (or in that
>much demand?)

No way!  But if you have a Frisbie Pie Company delivery truck you might
get $1000 for it.

I've seen collectors that have boxes of Frisbie Pie tins (there are several
periods - some have the words "Deposit 5c").

Jim Palmeri, the frisbee historian, can fill you in on the details.

If you have any mini-frisbees (diameter < 10cm.) I'd be interested.

Dudley Gaman
.

 
 
 

frisbees (frisbie pie tins)

Post by Eric Sim » Sat, 07 Sep 1991 23:41:02


I've heard that the going rate for frisbee pie tins were $25 to $75.

Way back in 1983 or so, I traded discs that were commonly thought of to
be workth about $30 to $35 for a frisbee pie tin.  (I believe it was a
165G special run disc of the year - on clear plastic - plus a throw in.  
The disc of the year, I believe, was either the Valley of the Sun, or the
one from St. Louis -- can't remember.)

 * Origin: Aronson Consulting: TIDMADT 703-370-7054, voice=x6508 (1:109/120)

 
 
 

frisbees (frisbie pie tins)

Post by Jim Palme » Thu, 12 Sep 1991 21:27:51

Quote:


>>Someone mentioned in sport.disc that a frisbie pie tin (the original
>>frisbee flying saucer - from the frisbie pie company) might be worth up
>>to $1000.00  Was he mistaken or are they really that rare (or in that
>>much demand?)

>No way!  But if you have a Frisbie Pie Company delivery truck you might
>get $1000 for it.

>I've seen collectors that have boxes of Frisbie Pie tins (there are several
>periods - some have the words "Deposit 5c").

>Jim Palmeri, the frisbee historian, can fill you in on the details.

>If you have any mini-frisbees (diameter < 10cm.) I'd be interested.

>Dudley Gaman
>.

Newsgroups: rec.sport.disc
Subject: Re: frisbees (frisbie pie tins)
Summary:
Expires:

Sender:

Organization: Moscom Corp., E. Rochester, NY
Keywords: frisbee frisbie

Quote:


>>Someone mentioned in sport.disc that a frisbie pie tin (the original
>>frisbee flying saucer - from the frisbie pie company) might be worth up
>>to $1000.00  Was he mistaken or are they really that rare (or in that
>>much demand?)

>No way!  But if you have a Frisbie Pie Company delivery truck you might
>get $1000 for it.

>I've seen collectors that have boxes of Frisbie Pie tins (there are several
>periods - some have the words "Deposit 5c").
>Dudley Gaman

When the first few Frisbie pie tins were discovered in 1975, they were
one of the most coveted collectors item among the disc players. (Back then,
virtually everyone who played was also a frisbee collector). $100 was
cheap, you could get $200 or more if you had any of the one or two
known to exist.  

Then Dan Roddick and Gary Seubert found a bunch and the price
quickly dropped to between 50 and 100 dollars per tin once the word
got out that there was a box load of them around.

Ron Kaufman and others found more and more as the years went on, and the
price per tin continued to waver.

Todays price varies from less than five dollars for the lowly plain
tin with merely an "F" marked in it to identify it as "possibly" a
Frisbie pie company tin, to an easy $100 for a good condition reverse
stamped "Frisbie" variety, the rare tin that reads "Frisbie" right side
up when held in the hand like a frisbee ready to be thrown.

In between are a number of varieties that all have the word "Frisbie
stamped in the bottom, but some with little breather holes punched in,
some without, and some with the 5 cent deposit stamped in as Dudley
mentioned.  Their value today ranges from 25 to 75 dollars, depending
upon their condition and how bad you want one.

A Frisbie pie tin expert like Ron Kaufman could go on and on about
the many subtle differences between sub-categories of tins, and
there relative worth, but I never had the opportunity to learn it
all.  It is quite a fascinating story though, maybe someone on the
net knows where he is and can get him to write up some info on the
subject.

Jim P.
--


 
 
 

frisbees (frisbie pie tins)

Post by Eric Sim » Fri, 13 Sep 1991 23:31:15

Thanks, Jim, for the great background on, not only the history of Frisbie
Pie tins, but the history from the collector's point of view.

This may sound like a silly question, but . . .
I have a cousin who in a collector of pie tins (!).  She's got an amazing
collection, and she would like to have a "frisbie".  She doesn't need
anything rare, just something with the word "frisbie" on it.  Do you know
where I can start to ask around?

Thanks buddy!

--  Eric

 * Origin: Aronson Consulting: TIDMADT 703-370-7054, voice=x6508 (1:109/120)

 
 
 

frisbees (frisbie pie tins)

Post by Paul Chamberla » Sat, 14 Sep 1991 05:24:14

Quote:
>>>Someone mentioned in sport.disc that a frisbie pie tin ...

When I first read this subject I thought it said "Frisbie tie pin".
Then I got to thinking about it, that's a good idea.
Anybody know where to get a Frisbee Tie Pin?

(I've noticed myself misreading things more and more ... need a vacation.)

Paul Chamberlain | I do NOT speak for IBM.          IBM VNET: PAULCC AT AUSTIN
512/838-9748     | ...!cs.utexas.edu!ibmchs!auschs!doorstop.austin.ibm.com!tif

 
 
 

frisbees (frisbie pie tins)

Post by du » Sun, 15 Sep 1991 02:16:42

Quote:

>Anybody know where to get a Frisbee Tie Pin?

How about a Frisbee Belt Buckle instead?

Dudley
.