Need golf course design info & rules

Need golf course design info & rules

Post by Beetl » Sat, 10 Sep 1994 13:05:01


There's a group of us playing disc golf at work.  We have an 18 hole
course, but the design was purely what we thought was fun.  We're
interested in what real courses are like.  Info like, typical yardages
and pars, wind conditions, obstacles.  Also, rules would be handy
(we've ordered a book that supposedly has them, but not sure how good
it'll be).  Any info would be much appreciated.

Christopher R. Bailey

Ride fast, take chances!

 
 
 

Need golf course design info & rules

Post by hausm.. » Wed, 14 Sep 1994 13:26:42


Quote:
> There's a group of us playing disc golf at work.  We have an 18 hole
> course, but the design was purely what we thought was fun.  We're
> interested in what real courses are like.  Info like, typical yardages
> and pars, wind conditions, obstacles.  Also, rules would be handy
> (we've ordered a book that supposedly has them, but not sure how good
> it'll be).  Any info would be much appreciated.

I would contact the PDGA.  The PDGA has a committee on course design and
probably has a booklet on the subject.

-Tom

 
 
 

Need golf course design info & rules

Post by Paul V. Brown, ph. +358-31-240-73 » Wed, 14 Sep 1994 20:37:56

Quote:


>> There's a group of us playing disc golf at work.  We have an 18 hole
>> course, but the design was purely what we thought was fun.  We're
>> interested in what real courses are like.  

> I would contact the PDGA.  The PDGA has a committee on course design and
> probably has a booklet on the subject.

Don't expect them to necessarily help you out tho -- I contacted them
twice (and once actually spoke with a real person instead of the answering
machine) and never got *anything* in return.  Maybe that'll change now
that I sent them my registration for joining the PDGA.  

It may be
unfair of me to rag on them, but damnit, I put in a course here in Finland,
and wanted some input from them ahead of time -- they didn't give it to me,
tho they claimed they would.  (They were supposed to both FAX and mail
me some material -- that was months ago!)  It's too late now, of course.
The course is in.  

By the way, Tom, thanks for your responses to my
questions way back when -- we have concrete tee pads
(tho only 1,20m x 3,90m), and the tee signs are the knee-high wooden
4x4's with a slanted face.  We had the text silk-screened onto wooden
blocks that were cut to fit the top of the 4x4's.  We were gonna have
plexiglass on top of that, but apparently it didn't look too hot, so
the folks that were doing them (the city's youth department) decided
to simply lacquer them.  We only put the signs in last week, so it's
hard to tell right now how well they're gonna stand up to the test of time
and weather.  Anyway -- I've gotten a bit off the subject...

--not impressed so far with the PDGA, but I went and joined anyway...
--
/************************************************************************/
/* Paul V. Brown                 *   "Play Hard, Play Fair, Have Fun"   */

/* puh. +358 31 2407 375         *                                      */
/************************************************************************/

 
 
 

Need golf course design info & rules

Post by Kenny Lem » Thu, 15 Sep 1994 07:06:22


Quote:


> >> There's a group of us playing disc golf at work.  We have an 18 hole
> >> course, but the design was purely what we thought was fun.  We're
> >> interested in what real courses are like.  

> > I would contact the PDGA.  The PDGA has a committee on course design and
> > probably has a booklet on the subject.

> Don't expect them to necessarily help you out tho -- I contacted them
> twice (and once actually spoke with a real person instead of the answering
> machine) and never got *anything* in return.  Maybe that'll change now
> that I sent them my registration for joining the PDGA.  

> It may be
> unfair of me to rag on them, but damnit, I put in a course here in Finland,
> and wanted some input from them ahead of time -- they didn't give it to me,
> tho they claimed they would.  (They were supposed to both FAX and mail
> me some material -- that was months ago!)  It's too late now, of course.
> The course is in.  

> By the way, Tom, thanks for your responses to my
> questions way back when -- we have concrete tee pads
> (tho only 1,20m x 3,90m), and the tee signs are the knee-high wooden
> 4x4's with a slanted face.  We had the text silk-screened onto wooden
> blocks that were cut to fit the top of the 4x4's.  We were gonna have
> plexiglass on top of that, but apparently it didn't look too hot, so
> the folks that were doing them (the city's youth department) decided
> to simply lacquer them.  We only put the signs in last week, so it's
> hard to tell right now how well they're gonna stand up to the test of time
> and weather.  Anyway -- I've gotten a bit off the subject...

> --not impressed so far with the PDGA, but I went and joined anyway...
> --
> /************************************************************************/
> /* Paul V. Brown                 *   "Play Hard, Play Fair, Have Fun"   */

> /* puh. +358 31 2407 375         *                                      */
> /************************************************************************/

I do not think there is a strict design limitation on the course.
I would suggest MachIII baskets and concrete tee pads.
Mach III's seem to pull the disc in better than any other.
Concrete is good for bad weather (or immediately after)

 Another popular trend is to put in a row of bricks for an alternate tee pad,
usually 50-100 feet further back, or off at an extreme angle from the other tee.
The benefit is two distinct courses with only 18 baskets.

 You can make a rule for the course, for example,
manditory right side of oak tree in middle of course.  If you miss, you must go
back and around this tree.

                                 --- Tee
                                    \
                                     \
                                      \ suggested flight path
                                       \
                                        \
                                         \
                                          \
                                           \
                                       \|/  |
                                        |   |
                                      (lame |
                                      tree) |
                                            /
                                           /
                                         /
                                        /
                                       /
                                      /
                                     /
                                   ___  
                                   \|/
                                   ---
                                    |

Good luck,  I turned a 10 ,hole into an 18 hole for the 1993 World Biggest
and had a lot of fun coming up with the new holes.

Kenny

 
 
 

Need golf course design info & rules

Post by do » Fri, 16 Sep 1994 08:16:33

Quote:


>> You can make a rule for the course, for example,
>>manditory right side of oak tree in middle of course.  If you miss,
>>you must go back and around this tree.
>Let me get in a quick vote *against* mandatories on disc golf courses.  My
>gut reaction has always been, "Mandatories are the result of uncreative golf
>hole design."  After all, you don't see golfers on Pebble Beach mando-ing
>around the majestic trees there....

In general I agree: far better to present the golfer with a puzzle to
solve (how do I get there from here) without constraining the
solutions. On the other hand, sometimes for course safety it's a good
idea to steer golfers away from driving down the adjacent fairway and
that sort of thing. In Austin, at Zilker Park, the 9-hole course has a
mandatory right-turn dogleg (an interesting problem for right-handed
throwers, actually) on hole, uh....seven. It's primarily to protect
people near the basket at hole 6, but it also makes what would be an
easy par and moderately easy bird into a challenging par and a very
rewarding bird. *Shrug*. Best if you have enough space to lay out
holes so they don't come anywhere near overlapping, but if you can't,
mandatories may save you some grief.

And of course, in ball golf, driving way off the fairway is often
o.b. as well, so it's not like THAT'S an unconstrained game....

doc

--

Disc Golf Page: http://www.cqs.washington.edu/~josh/discgolf.html
     She wants to see you again/slowly twisting in the wind

 
 
 

Need golf course design info & rules

Post by Tom Kraj » Fri, 16 Sep 1994 01:42:20

Quote:

> You can make a rule for the course, for example,
>manditory right side of oak tree in middle of course.  If you miss, you must go
>back and around this tree.

Let me get in a quick vote *against* mandatories on disc golf courses.  My
gut reaction has always been, "Mandatories are the result of uncreative golf
hole design."  After all, you don't see golfers on Pebble Beach mando-ing
around the majestic trees there.

However, the reality is that some places simply don't have the foliage
and/or topography to make for interesting golf holes without a bit of help
from forced Cartesian geometry.

If you *do* put in mandatories, remember that someone (either from your group
or an official) will have to make judgement calls as to whether the disc
successfully passed around the object.  I've seen this be a controversial
area, as strong throwers sometimes go right over the top of a tree to try to
save a stroke.

If a thrower does miss a mandatory, then there's the problem of how to get
around it the right way.  I'm not sure nowadays whether "break the planes"
or "unwrap" is the rule.  I know "break the planes" used to be rather
confusing, while "unwrap" could send your score booming if you cut it too
close and missed and then cut it too close and missed and then...

--Tom K.