Ultimate Wheel (strange subject for a topic like handle bars, isn't it?)

Ultimate Wheel (strange subject for a topic like handle bars, isn't it?)

Post by Wolfgang Stroessne » Fri, 12 Dec 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> Any chance you could make a picture available on the net we could look
> at?

Sorry, I don't have taken pictures yet and at the moment I actually don't own a
(working) camera. So I can't send you any pictures withing the next time. But
I'll try to get you an ASCII drawing I already sent Steven Newcombe in July:

           __
   seat->  \ \
            \ \
            |\_\
            |
            |\  /___/
            | \  /   <- handle bar
seat post-> |  \/
            |
           / \
          |   |
          |
      here is the wheel

Hope this helps.

Wolfgang

              \\\|///
              | ~ ~ |
             (- 0 0 -)
+----------oOOo-(_)-oOOo----------------------------------------------------+
|                                                                           |
|  Wolfgang Stroessner    Phone: +49 30 4537159   (home)                    |
|  Bruesseler Str. 37            +49 30 2093-2352 (office)                  |

|  Germany                http://Spectrum.Mathematik.HU-Berlin.DE/~stroess  |
|                   Oooo.                                                   |
+---------.oooO-----(  )----------------------------------------------------+
           (  )     ) /
            \ (    (_/
             \_)

 
 
 

Ultimate Wheel (strange subject for a topic like handle bars, isn't it?)

Post by Nicholas Pric » Fri, 12 Dec 1997 04:00:00

Quote:


> > Any chance you could make a picture available on the net we could look
> > at?

> Sorry, I don't have taken pictures yet and at the moment I actually don't own
 a
> (working) camera. So I can't send you any pictures withing the next time. But
> I'll try to get you an ASCII drawing I already sent Steven Newcombe in July:

>            __
>    seat->  \ \
>             \ \
>             |\_\
>             |
>             |\  /___/
>             | \  /   <- handle bar
> seat post-> |  \/
>             |
>            / \
>           |   |
>           |
>       here is the wheel

> Hope this helps.

> Wolfgang

Is it just me or does the ASCII picture look a lot like an alien with
some weird arm appendage!
Nic

 
 
 

Ultimate Wheel (strange subject for a topic like handle bars, isn't it?)

Post by Ken Fuch » Sun, 14 Dec 1997 04:00:00

Quote:


>> Handlebars for long distance riding and handlebars for performance,
>> racing or off-roading might have to be very different shapes to do
>> their jobs properly. I think I would prefer something that comes
>> off the front of my seat post (or seat), offering support directly
>> in front of me. The actual bar could be made large enough to hold a
>> computer, brake lever or windshield wiper switch.
>I'd suggest to try the seat post, not the seat. I constructed the
>handle bar for my 28" uni this way and it works great. Michael Kirsch
>has tried attaching a handle bar directly to the seat, but the base
>plate was not strong enough to withstand the forces it had to
>stand. Another advantage of attaching it to the post is that you
>easily can adjust the height. And last but not least it's much
>easier to build.

A single 3/8 inch stainless steel rod can be welded as a brace on
Miyata seat posts to stiffen and support the front of the steel base
plate where the seat is mounted.  This may make Miyata seats with a
front handle more effective.  However, strengthening the seat post
base plate may cause the seat itself to take more stress.  On the
other hand, the Miyata seats seem to be less prone to failure than
(unbraced) Miyata seat base plates.

Two 5/16 inch stainless steel rod braces can provide support closer to
the front end of the seat base plate and to each of the two front
corners of the base plate, resulting in an even stiffer base plate (at
the front end).

Stainless steel will match the rest of the seat post in appearance and
texture.  More importantly, stainless steel is extremely resistant to
rust formation.

The front seat plate braces may also be effective for other brands of
unicycles.  A stiff front seat plate is a positive attribute in a
unicycle, even one without a handle built into the seat.  Both
artistic unicycling and long distance coasting are easier with a
stiffer seat plate and seat.  It may be an advantage in MUNI as well.

Finally, a separate steel handle below the seat braced to the seat
post as mentioned before (done well) is clearly superior to the
alternative I mentioned.  However, my alternative also strengthens the
front of the seat plate and consequently the seat as well.

Perhaps, a seat plate brace can be combined with a separate steel
handle brace?

The separate handle shouldn't extend more than a few inches in front
of the seat.  However, it should be far enough forward so there is
plenty of room between the seat and handle for one's hands to easily
move between without even the remotest possibility of getting caught
even temporarily.

Sincerely,