Semcycle hardware troubles

Semcycle hardware troubles

Post by Ru.. » Sun, 10 Sep 1995 04:00:00


Semcycles are fine unicycles. You should not have those problems.

The loss of air on the tire really has nothing to do with the rest of
the unicycle. Check the adjustment of the valve on your tire and
your inner tube for slow leaks. The worst that could happen is
that you change the inner tube which is not a major investment.

The left crank should not loosen up if you have a lefthanded crank
there. The more you pedal the tighter it should get. Maybe you got
two righthanded cranks by mistake. The lefthanded crank tightens
counterclockwise. The pedal, of course, should also be lefthanded.

Alberto Ruiz

PD: I do not work for Semcycle.

 
 
 

Semcycle hardware troubles

Post by Ron Wichers Schre » Tue, 12 Sep 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
> The loss of air on the tire really has nothing to do with the rest of
> the unicycle. Check the adjustment of the valve on your tire and
> your inner tube for slow leaks. The worst that could happen is
> that you change the inner tube which is not a major investment.

This is probably a silly question, but how do you change the tyre?
I've been look at my 24" SemCycle and couldn't see how I could
remove the wheel. Do I need any special tools? I know I'm not
very handy, but changing a tube should be within my abbilities.

Cheers,

Ronny Wichers Schreur


 
 
 

Semcycle hardware troubles

Post by Peter Phil » Tue, 12 Sep 1995 04:00:00

The quick part first...

Quote:
> This is probably a silly question, but how do you change the tyre?
> I've been look at my 24" SemCycle and couldn't see how I could
> remove the wheel. Do I need any special tools? I know I'm not
> very handy, but changing a tube should be within my abbilities.

Undo the main bolt that holds the forks to the stem.  The forks will then
come apart and you can change the tyre.

Now the bigger problem...

Loosening of cotterless cranks is a common problem, but it can be solved
or (even better) avoided completely in the following ways:

* don't ride if the cranks are loose
      not only does the axle eat into a loose crank and make it almost
      impossible to get it to fit well ever again, but the jarring of the
      loose crank against the axle greatly increases the chance of the
      axle shearing off completely!

* seat the crank well on to the axle
      use a *** hammer if you can to avoid damaging the thread so that
      extracting the crank will be easier.  Once the crank is seat firmly
      in place the contact between all of the faces of the axle and the
      crank should be so secure that the nut should not have to do much
      work.

* make sure the the nut doesn't start to work loose
      once a nut has developed the habit for working loose it is much
      harder to stop it.  The best solution we have come up with so far
      is thread tape, which you can wrap around the thread on the axle
      before you put the nut on.

* if the parts are damaged, replace them
      nuts are cheap.  Worn ones are not worth the bother.  If riding with
      a loose crank has caused damage to the crank, and filing the faces
      of the hole in the crank does not make a tight fit on the axle
      possible, then get another crank.  This is greatly preferable to
      breaking the axle and having to rebuild the whole wheel.

* don't assume that because the uni is new, the cranks are well fitted

These lessons are the fruit of years of bitter experience both from my own
uni and those of my team-mates.  The main point is that prevention is better
than cure and if you get it right first time you never need to have a
problem.

Peter

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Peter Philip             of the LUNIs   -   London's Unicycle Hockey Team
Coordinator of UNICON VIII     -     The World Unicycling Convention 1996

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
 
 

Semcycle hardware troubles

Post by Larry Mei » Wed, 13 Sep 1995 04:00:00

As a follow-up to removing cottered cranks.  If the key doesn't come out
easily, put the nut (or better yet, an old spare) back on the key leaving
it a few turns loose.  You then can bang on the nut instead of the
threads of the key, avoiding damage to the threads on the key.

Regards,
                Larry